Executive Matters

June 2002

"ANYONE WHO STOPS LEARNING IS OLD, WHETHER AT TWENTY OR EIGHTY. ANYONE WHO KEEPS LEARNING STAYS YOUNG. THE GREATEST THING IN LIFE IS TO KEEP YOUR MIND YOUNG."
HENRY FORD


In an effort to help you stay young while succeeding in business, the June edition of Executive Matters includes:

  1. TAKE THE AMA 2002 SURVEY ON INTERNAL COLLABORATION
  2. BABY BOOMERS VS. GEN XERS IN THE WORKPLACE
  3. WHO'S ON THE NET? TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE
  4. USING EXECUTIVE SPEAKING ENGAGEMENTS TO PROMOTE YOUR COMPANY
  5. STEPS TO SUCCESS
  6. HOW TO CREATE TACTICS THAT BRING STRATEGIC PLANNING TO LIFE
  7. HEADS UP ON TWO UPCOMING AMA CONFERENCES
  8. TWO WAYS TO SAVE BIG $ ON AMA SEMINARS
  9. RESULTS OF THE AMA VACATION PLANS SURVEY

red dot 1. TAKE THE AMA 2002 SURVEY ON INTERNAL COLLABORATION
Do your company's departments cooperate with each other in building your business or is your organization composed of "silos?" Take this survey and benchmark the level of collaboration in your company with other organizations. Results will be in a future issue of Executive Matters.

In This Issue

Taking the AMA 2002 Survey on Internal Collaboration

Baby Boomers vs. Gen Xers in the Workplace

Who's on the Net? Test Your Knowledge

Using Executive Speaking Engagements to Promote Your Company

Steps to Success

How to Create Tactics That Bring Strategic Planning to Life

Heads Up on Two Upcoming AMA Conferences

Two Ways To Save Big $ on AMA Seminars

Results of 2002 Summer Vacation Plans Survey

 

 

red dot 2. BABY BOOMERS VS. GEN XERS IN THE WORKPLACE
It sounds like the making of a great boxing match: in this corner, those loyal, dependable, team-loving Baby Boomers (born between 1945 and 1962); in the opposite corner, the Generation Xers (born between 1963 and 1982) often stereotyped as self-absorbed, pampered, tech-loving, job-shifting slackers.

According to a new book, "Bridging the Boomer Xer Gap," by Hank Karp, Connie Fuller and Danilo Sirias (Davies-Black Publishing, 2002) these two generations can work and play well together. However, each generation needs to let go of some commonly held myths about the other:

Boomers need to give up the notion that Xers are slackers, not committed to their jobs, uncaring about the quality and importance of their work, unwilling to put in the time and effort to produce a quality product and only concerned about when and where their next vacation will be. In fact, Xers can be very loyal, hard workers. However, their commitment must serve a higher purpose than filling an 8-hour workday or gaining a paycheck. They are always looking for the next new and interesting thing to do.

Xers need to let go of the myths that Boomers are old geezers who are resistant to change, tightly locked into a traditional way of doing things; that they yearn for the good ole' days and are only concerned about seniority and pension plans. While some Boomers may not be as technically savvy as Xers, the Boomer generation has always valued learning and personal development. What Boomers generally don't like is unnecessary risk. If something is working, they see no reason to change it. Click http://www.amamember.org/management/index.cfm for advice on how organizations can create environments where both generations can flourish.

red dot3. WHO'S ON THE NET? TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE
If you're doing business online, you should know who's surfing and who's buying via the Internet. Rate your online knowledge. Correct answers appear at the end of this newsletter. (The complete self-assessment appears on AMA's Members Only website at
http://membersonly.amamember.org/self_assess

1.The United States has about one-third of all Internet users. What two countries are in second and third place?
a. United Kingdom and Canada
b. Japan and China
c. Germany and Russia

2.In the United States, do more people access the Internet from home or from work?
a. Home
b. Work
c. About the same

3.What cities in the United States have the highest percentage of households with home Internet access?
a. Portland and Seattle
b. New York and Los Angeles
c. Dallas and Atlanta

red dot 4. USING EXECUTIVE SPEAKING ENGAGEMENTS TO PROMOTE YOUR COMPANY
Here's an excellent, cost-effective way to enhance your company's reputation and generate new business: develop an effective speaker placement program for your top executives. There are many public forums which provide opportunities to spread the good word about your company -- conferences and seminars held by independent event organizations, associations, professional and industry trade groups, academic institutions and think tanks. Here are some first steps an organization can take to develop a program to take advantage of these public relations and marketing opportunities:

- Decide which products or services the firm wants to promote.
- Choose the right speaker-- experienced executives and, preferably, talented speakers. Small-to medium-sized organizations should nominate their CEO or other senior executive. Large organizations can also choose staff at the director or manager level.
- Speak to the right audience. Thoroughly research events before you commit.
- Decide on the geographic area you want to target--locally, regionally, nationally or even internationally.
- Create high-impact presentations. A solid, informative presentation includes actionable information the audience can take back to their organizations--it is NOT a sales pitch for your company or its products.

red dot5. STEPS TO SUCCESS
Still struggling to pull your company, your division or your team out of the downturn? Here's some "uncommon common sense" from management consultant Rob Wilson on how to succeed in business:
-Find your intrinsic competitive advantage and leverage it. Create a one- or two-sentence statement that differentiates you from the competition.
-Begin with the end in mind. Ask tough questions: what do I hope to accomplish by pursuing this strategy, executing this tactic or even having this conversation?
-Think strategically, not tactically.
-Do something meaningful yet achievable. Begin with small steps and then build on them.
-Get a checkup from the neck up. As a leader, are you saying and doing the things that your people need to hear and see to believe in what the company is doing, and to give their best efforts to help you get there?

red dot6. HOW TO CREATE TACTICS THAT BRING STRATEGIC PLANNING TO LIFE
Marketing 101 teaches us to first formulate marketing strategies, then come up with the tactics to achieve them. Richard Czerniawski and Mike Maloney, co-authors of "Creating Brand Loyalty," maintain that while strategies are important, they are ultimately useless--even counterproductive--if the company lacks the ability to successfully execute them.

Where to start?
-Identify key business and marketing objectives.
-Brainstorm tactics available to you and assess the potential of each in enabling the brand to achieve its strategic objectives.
-Identify the key drivers for success and competitors' capabilities in these areas.
-Determine the degrees of strategic freedom open to your brand through your company's capabilities in both the absolute and relative to competition.
-Create strategies you can successfully execute, that will permit you a competitive advantage and lead to achievement of your key objectives.

UPDATE YOUR MEMBER PROFILE
Recent changes in your job title, company, or e-mail address? Be sure to update or modify your personal member profile.
Just click on
http://membersonly.amamember.org/my_account/index.cfm

red dot7. HEADS UP ON TWO UPCOMING AMA CONFERENCES:

CORPORATE BRANDING 2002
When: November 13-14, 2002
Where: Marriott O'Hare Hotel, Chicago
Highlights: Top Marketing experts from BMW, Kinko's, Xerox and other leading firms will provide proven strategies and tactics for building powerful brands. Early Bird Discounts: Register and pay before August 1st and save $100 off the already reduced member rate!

10TH ANNUAL ADMINISTRATIVE PROFESSIONAL CONFERENCE
When: October 28-30, 2002
Where: Caesars Palace, Las Vegas
Highlights: Trail-blazer Erin Brockovich, motivational speaker Dr. Traci Lynn, trainer Keith Harrell, change expert Sheila Murray Bethel plus five learning tracks and much more. Early Bird Discounts: Register and pay before August 1st and save $100 off the already reduced member rate!

red dot 8. TWO WAYS TO SAVE BIG $ ON AMA SEMINARS:
*Members Only: Save up to 50% off the current member price when you register for select AMA seminars.

*Register for any AMA seminar held between now and December 31, 2002 and bring a colleague or friend for up 25% off the applicable member or non-member price.
Call 1-800-262-9699 for details.

red dot 9. RESULTS OF 2002 SUMMER VACATION PLANS SURVEY
Nearly 98 recent of managers plan to take a summer vacation, but many will remain in contact with the office while away, according to last month's AMA survey of 645 business executives. Nearly 62 percent of those surveyed will check in with their offices at least once a week and as many as quarter of them will be in daily contact while on vacation. Thirty-six percent plan to conduct some office-related work and 16 percent will in touch with clients or customers at least once a week while away.

CORRECT ANSWERS TO NET KNOWLEDGE QUIZ:
1-b According to the Computer Industry Almanac's rankings at the end of 2000, Japan and China were in second and third place behind the U.S. That count was for all Internet users, however. If instead you count those who go online at least weekly, China gets bumped to seventh place and Germany takes over in third place.

2-a According to a Nielsen/NetRatings study, during one week in April, more than twice as many Americans accessed the Internet from home (75 million) than from work (34 million). But those who did go online from work did it more often (averaging 11 sessions compared to six from home) and viewed more sites (14 compared to 6).

3-a In Portland and Seattle nearly 70% of households have Internet access from home, according to a Nielsen/NetRatings study. (Do you suppose they all work for Microsoft?) New York and Los Angeles may be big, but only about 55% of households have home Internet access. Atlanta and Dallas rank in between, at about 60%.

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EXECUTIVE MATTERS is a monthly newsletter created exclusively for Executive Members of the American Management Association, 1601 Broadway, New York, New York 10019.
Editor: Florence Stone (fstone@amanet.org)

Copyright 2002: American Management Association. Material in this issue may be quoted free of charge provided the following reference is given: 'Source: American Management Association, http://www.amanet.org/, 800-262-9699.

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